March 31, 2009

March 03, 2009

March 01, 2009

February 27, 2009

February 16, 2009

February 04, 2009

January 21, 2009

January 20, 2009

What is the Age of Hooper?

  • 'The builders did not know the uses to which their work would descend; they made a new house with the stones of the old castle; year by year, generation after generation, they enriched and extended it; year by year the great harvest of timber in the park grew to ripeness; until, in sudden frost, came the Age of Hooper; the place was desolate and the work all brought to nothing; Quomodo sedet sola civitas. Vanity of vanities, all is vanity." ..... Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited

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Books I Recommend

  • Paul M. Johnson: Modern Times  Revised Edition: The World from the Twenties to the Nineties

    Paul M. Johnson: Modern Times Revised Edition: The World from the Twenties to the Nineties
    A sober and sobering review of the 20th Century and the monsters it created.

  • P. G. Wodehouse: The Code of the Woosters

    P. G. Wodehouse: The Code of the Woosters
    Perfect.

  • Evelyn Waugh: Brideshead Revisited

    Evelyn Waugh: Brideshead Revisited
    Everything started going wrong and this world became a world of midgets. Still, redemption may be around the corner.

  • Conor Cruise O'Brien: The Siege: The Saga of Israel and Zionism

    Conor Cruise O'Brien: The Siege: The Saga of Israel and Zionism
    One of the most comprehensive, fair-minded, and illuminating histories of Israel and the Zionist movement that created it.

  • Bruce Catton: A Stillness at Appomattox

    Bruce Catton: A Stillness at Appomattox
    A taste: "The men of this army left books and letters behind them, and in these there is remarkable testimony that the men who marched away from winter quarters that morning took a last look back and saw a golden haze which, even at the moment of looking, they knew they would never see again. They tell how the birds were singing, and how the warm scented air came rolling up the river valley, and how they noticed things like wildflowers and the young green leaves, and they speak of the moving pageant which they saw and of which they themselves were part. "Everything," wrote a youth from Maine, "was bright and blowing." It would never be like this again, and young soldiers in a land that would honor them and then tolerate them and finally forget them, would look back on this one morning and see in it something that came from beyond the rim of the world."